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 Post subject: Anatomy of a Cue: Coring
PostPosted: Wed Dec 21, 2011 7:54 am 
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Coring is a term being used more frequently in the world of cuemaking. Coring is simply drilling a hole through the forearm or handle of a cue and gluing another piece of wood inside. Straight grain maple or a laminated maple are the most popular cores. Why would you want to do this? well there are several reasons.

Stability: Some figured woods are not stable and strong so a core is needed to make it usable.
Burls are a good example of woods that need to be cored.

Weight: Some woods like ebony are very dense and coring them with a lighter wood like maple
is sometimes needed if the customer wants a lighter cue.

Consistency: Some cuemakers core all their cues in a effort to make them consistent. Since
the core makes up the majority of the forearm the outer wood becomes more decoration.

Hit: Like a chef combining flavors some cuemakers are combining different cores with their
forearms to create a distinct hit and feel.

Now that you know why cues are cored lets have a look at how it is done.

The first step is to drill a starter hole

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Then the hole is bored.

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This is the gun drill used to finish the hole.

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Hole being drilled all the way through the forearm.

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Here is the core material being turned in the lathe. This core must fit just right to insure a good glue bond.

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Finished core ready to be glued.

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Forearms and cores waiting to be glued.

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Gluing the cores into the forearms. I like to use a poly glue for this because it expands and foams up. This won't cure a bad fit but it gives me confidence that every nook and cranny has been filled and I have a good glue joint. Now that they are glued I can enjoy a cold beverage while they dry.

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All dry and ready to be tapered and made into a cue.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 21, 2011 9:16 am 
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Great stuff, III.

Scott

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 21, 2011 9:36 am 
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I am still trying to figure out how you keep the machine so clean. That is amazing in it self.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 21, 2011 9:44 am 
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 21, 2011 10:00 am 
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Thanks Murray. I have several cored cues but I really didn't know the process before this thread.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 21, 2011 11:03 am 
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Is that purpleheart handle cored with purpleheart?


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 21, 2011 11:08 am 
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Curly purpleheart forearm cored with purpleheart. Worried about the curly not being stable.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 21, 2011 11:46 am 
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Just to make sure my pea brain has it.....

You drill, bore, then gun drill to final size?

If that is right, how much undersize to you bore to? I always assumed the gun drill did the bulk of the work, but it looks like you are using it to fine tune to your finished result.

Also, it looks like your core dowel is not perfectly smooth. Is that to provide a mechanical bond in addition to the adhesive bond of the glue?

Thanks again for posting these. I really need to get down your way and learn a few tricks.

Scott

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Last edited by ScottR on Thu Dec 22, 2011 10:07 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 21, 2011 12:09 pm 
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ScottR wrote:
Just to make sure my pea brain has it.....

You drill, bore, then gun drill to final size?

If that is right, how much undersize to you bore to? I always assumed the gun drill did the bulk of the work, but it will looks like you are using it to fine tune to your finished result.

Also, it looks like your core dowel is not perfectly smooth. Is that to provide a mechanical bond in addition to the adhesive bond of the glue?

Thanks again for post these. I really need to get down your way and learn a few tricks.

Scott

scott, you have to have a starter hole exact size of gun drill , like a pilot
if your pilot hole is dead on, the gun drill will follow perfectly

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 21, 2011 12:15 pm 
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Brent is correct. A gun drill does not work like a normal drill so you have to make a starter hole to get it going in the right direction. I drill and bore the first 4 inches or so to the diameter of the gun drill that I am using. You don't have to go that deep but my bar is that long so it works out for me.

I also cut a spiral for glue relief. Looks deeper than it really is. It is only about .005 deep.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 21, 2011 1:17 pm 
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Murray Tucker wrote:
.... I like to use a poly glue ...... Now that they are glued I can enjoy a cold beverage while they dry.


So it takes about 20 seconds for the poly to dry/set ??? I'm pretty sure that's how long it takes you to enjoy a cold beverage :P

Thanks for the great thread, I look forward to one on how to use the shop vac, as are others I'm sure.

Dave <-- doesn't use the shop vac often enough


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 21, 2011 2:05 pm 
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Ok that makes sense.

Better to be safe then sorry.

Murray Tucker wrote:
Curly purpleheart forearm cored with purpleheart. Worried about the curly not being stable.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 21, 2011 4:26 pm 
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Tony_in_MD wrote:
Is that purpleheart handle cored with purpleheart?


Sounds like a perfectly great idea.

Jim <----Only wants a PH core

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 21, 2011 5:45 pm 
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Thanks for the informative thread.
One question, is a cue ever cored for the whole length of the butt? That is, one piece core that goes through the forearm, handle, and butt sleeve. No idea why anyone would want to do that. Just wondering if it was ever done.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 21, 2011 6:08 pm 
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When and why is it NOT a good idea to core? Why do a good number of cuemakers not core and are adamantly against it?
They aren't newbies, hacks, or lack equipment by any stretch of the imagination.

I'm just glad I never got into making cues to have to buy all the lathes, drills, and other equipment. I did have a shop vac though. :mrgreen: Interesting thread.


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