RIP "Blud"

Another One Gone
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 13, 2015 3:45 pm 
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My mind must be slipping. I thought I had read the $100,000 offer to teach and tool up a cuemaker. Guess it was wishful thinking.

Larry


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 13, 2015 4:55 pm 
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ThomasWayne wrote:
Ted Harris wrote:
That's like STEALING if ya have the cheddar! 8)

P.S. Straight up ROBBERY! I don't know ANY other way to say it!


Teddy,

How long you known me?

Before you go bandying around terms like "stealing" and "robbery" in connection with MY name, why don't you get your "quote" straightened out enough so I can actually track down whomever posted that "$100,000" bullshit statement. Then I can go tear THAT lying cocksucker a new asshole... instead of thinking ill of you.

TW


Thomas,
I hope you realize that my post was meant as a compliment to you. If I were starting out now, I would gladly pay you $100,000 to learn & be tooled up by you! I still cling to much of the terminology that I picked up from my pool playing gambling days, and my use of "stealing" and "robbery" were meant to emphasize my sincerity in believing that would be a fantastic deal. Hell, $100,000 probably ain't enough! The reality is that most people don't want to pay what that kind of knowledge translates to in education & machinery. They think they can get it easier by trial & error. Fact is, most of us would gladly pay for the knowledge we have acquired...but hindsight is 20/20. I've spent hundreds of thousands of dollars in my pursuit of this dream, and I know it would've saved me years & who knows how much money! I apologize for my choice of words.

Your friend,
Teddy

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 13, 2015 6:47 pm 
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I have taught only a select few people over the last 10 years . . . before that I never felt qualified to suggest that I had the knowledge/ability to teach anyone anything that they should pay me for.

When I was in college, and yes I do have a degree in marketing, among others, the professors didn't just say "pull up a chair class is about to begin" - no - it was off to the bursars office to pay tuition for class. So after 4 years undergraduate and 5 years of graduate education here I am . . . I would have gladly spent much of that tuition money on learning cuemaking had I known then what I know now and the opportunity been presented me.

That is not to say that all that time in school (and money spent) didn't help me. The point is - nothing is free and learning the steps necessary to be successful in this business does come at a cost.

Larry is right on target when he suggest that time and money spent with the right individual will ultimately save in the end. Unfortunately, most accomplished makers have a full plate and many of those that don't may lack the skill to really teach what they know - IMO.

Sam Snead (boy am I dating myself now) was a great golfer, but by his own admission could not teach what he knew and Lee Travino another great golfer, has a style so unorthodox that most could never learn. No one makes it thru this life without a bit of help along the way . . . be smart, seek the help that will provide the greatest benefit and be prepared to pay for it.

Paul

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 14, 2015 7:31 am 
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Ted Harris wrote:

P.S. Straight up ROBBERY! I don't know ANY other way to say it!



If I were starting out now, I would gladly pay you $100,000 to learn & be tooled up by you! I still cling to much of the terminology that I picked up from my pool playing gambling days, and my use of "stealing" and "robbery" were meant to emphasize my sincerity in believing that would be a fantastic deal. Hell, $100,000 probably ain't enough! The reality is that most people don't want to pay what that kind of knowledge translates to in education & machinery. They think they can get it easier by trial & error. Fact is, most of us would gladly pay for the knowledge we have acquired...but hindsight is 20/20. I've spent hundreds of thousands of dollars in my pursuit of this dream, and I know it would've saved me years & who knows how much money! I apologize for my choice of words.

Teddy[/quote]

This post, Paul's post, and Larry's post all say what I was trying to get across when starting this thread.

One way or another there's ALWAYS a price to pay for success in any profession but one doesn't see the benefits of paying for the education directly out of their pocket to a well known successful cuemaker when they think they can dig it out of the ground themselves.
If being a hobbyist is the goal to make cues just to make cues for self and friends, so be it. But if it's to get better and better for recognition and profit, it will end up being far more costly in time, material waste due to fuck ups, and cues that don't deserve high enough prices to warrant much profit.

But then again, I haven't seen one really successful cuemaker who wanted to teach others for profit. Maybe successful cuemakers never retire from cuemaking and would rather just continue making cues and keep their techniques to themselves. Although the name Bill Stroud pops up as retired and knowledgeable.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 14, 2015 1:14 pm 
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can somebody define successful? By my definition, you could take 100 guys to school.....each spending a year or so with 3-4 of the best cue makers you can think of.....2 of them may be successful.

No substitute for talent

Jake< can think of 5 successful cuemakers and a handful of others with the aptitude

However, i do think the initial schooling can certainly take years and $ off the basic principles and initial investment

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Just because Jake doesnt know how to do it, doesnt mean it cant be done!


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 14, 2015 1:31 pm 
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Jake wrote:

However, i do think the initial schooling can certainly take years and $ off the basic principles and initial investment


So isn't this at least the bottom line of successful? IF they should go on to varying degrees of greater heights every step beyond is that much greater success.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 14, 2015 6:56 pm 
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wyattearp wrote:
Jake wrote:

However, i do think the initial schooling can certainly take years and $ off the basic principles and initial investment


So isn't this at least the bottom line of successful? IF they should go on to varying degrees of greater heights every step beyond is that much greater success.


Big Negative....being better is easy. Minor varying degrees of success can easily still be mediocre at best and attained with half efforts and little to no risk.

Success should be considered profound


Jake<hardass today

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 14, 2015 10:42 pm 
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Jake wrote:
By my definition, you could take 100 guys to school.....each spending a year or so with 3-4 of the best cue makers you can think of.....2 of them may be successful.

No substitute for talent


I think this is generally true, not just in cue making. It is also likely that the 3-4 best cue makers would have a pretty good idea who the 2 successful guys will be.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2015 7:54 am 
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Jake wrote:
wyattearp wrote:
Jake wrote:

However, i do think the initial schooling can certainly take years and $ off the basic principles and initial investment


So isn't this at least the bottom line of successful? IF they should go on to varying degrees of greater heights every step beyond is that much greater success.


Big Negative....being better is easy. Minor varying degrees of success can easily still be mediocre at best and attained with half efforts and little to no risk.

Success should be considered profound


Jake<hardass today


There are other factors for success than just being able to build a much better cue such as work ethic, organization, and keeping the nose to the grindstone...being able to fulfill the promise or estimate for when the cue will be started and completed...and treating customers with respect instead of hiding if a cue is long overdue. There's far too much of that shit in the world of cumaking.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2015 9:04 am 
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Most of those thing should have been taught by parents. Long before the decision to taking up cue making.

Larry


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2015 9:53 am 
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Jake's observation that there is "no substitute for talent" is right on target.

Perhaps Bill Schick said it best when he said "if you don't have the talent/skill in your hands it is going to be a very long and tough road to success in cuemaking."

And yes there are other factors such as those that Wyatt has listed that do impact the overall "success" - but much of those have to do with the basic morals and ethics that individuals bring to the party . . . not sure how many of those can be taught after the fact.

Paul


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2015 4:28 pm 
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63Kcode wrote:
Most of those thing should have been taught by parents. Long before the decision to taking up cue making.

Larry


Most parents more than likely did teach it. Based on the threads and posts over the years on all pool forums about cuemakers screwing buyers over big time in all kinds of ways...their kids didn't fuckin' listen. Now as adults, they're even WORSE!


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2015 5:17 pm 
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How many went through Blud ? I can think of two. Their cues look and construction resemble Blud's.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2015 6:13 pm 
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wyattearp wrote:
63Kcode wrote:
Most of those thing should have been taught by parents. Long before the decision to taking up cue making.

Larry


Most parents more than likely did teach it. Based on the threads and posts over the years on all pool forums about cuemakers screwing buyers over big time in all kinds of ways...their kids didn't fuckin' listen. Now as adults, they're even WORSE!


And they are going to pay to attend a seminar. Hold hands with a successful cuemaker. Then they won't cheat customers anymore?

We have had many people locally who started building cues. Most started because they retired or got laid off and thought for a few thousand dollars, They would be building cues for profit. Most have just given up. Before they dug a hole they couldn't honestly get out of.

Larry


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 16, 2015 7:08 am 
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63Kcode wrote:
wyattearp wrote:
63Kcode wrote:
Most of those thing should have been taught by parents. Long before the decision to taking up cue making.

Larry


Most parents more than likely did teach it. Based on the threads and posts over the years on all pool forums about cuemakers screwing buyers over big time in all kinds of ways...their kids didn't fuckin' listen. Now as adults, they're even WORSE!


And they are going to pay to attend a seminar. Hold hands with a successful cuemaker. Then they won't cheat customers anymore?

You gotta be shittin' me! HELL NO they're not going to go to a seminar for ANY REASONS! First of all they already think they know more about cuemaking than 90% of all other cuemakers out there and secondly they'd rather continue making excuses to be douche bags because they have some sort of superiority complex about THEY AND THEIR CUES being in such high demand that buyers are willing and SHOULD BE WILLING to put up with anything they spew out of their mouths.

(examples) "My family comes first over cuemaking"..."I've had a bad streak of personal problems needing my time over cues"..."My health hasn't been too good"..."Your cue got misplaced among all the other misplaced cues in my shop and I had no way to identify any of them. What did your cue look like again?" "I'll get it out next week, maybe next month, could be next year." "I'll get to it when I get to it, you knew how I work before you approved the start of the cue. Don't bother me again, it'll eventually be done."


We have had many people locally who started building cues. Most started because they retired or got laid off and thought for a few thousand dollars, They would be building cues for profit. Most have just given up. Before they dug a hole they couldn't honestly get out of.

Larry


Yeh, same thing happened with golf clubs when clubmaking and repair was the big rage. They were unqualified HACKS who didn't know enough and put out shoddy work as well as not knowing how to market themselves to get business.


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