RIP John Davis

Been a Tough Year
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 19, 2009 6:10 pm 
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Michael Webb wrote:
Welcome Eric
First off, Any angry asian women should be directed to their counterparts, especially if they don't know how to cook. :mrgreen: If they cook, remember your friends.
What's your plans if any for expanding. Do you have enough machines?
What's your opinion on inlays?



Hey!! Just because I've set cheese on fire and fkd up instant noodles doesnt mean jack sh1t!

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 19, 2009 6:20 pm 
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i believe i came up with cuegar(tm) and gave that particular gem to one OMGWTF. like sac-fresh(tm). you can try to argue but as the mayor i'm gonna over rule you.

----

Crispy,

As someone who's cues developed it's reputation online, what is your feeling on flippers and the prices of your cues in the secondary market?

Would you make a cue for a person knowing that they are going to flip it immediately for a profit?

Do you feel like you've started a trend where "simpler" cues, "plain janes", are now demanding a higher price? what is your feeling on the prices being asked for those types of cues now?

How has your cue's online popularity changed the way you build cues or price cues? (if it has i mean)

How much wood could a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood?

What's your feelings concerning other people's blanks, buying blanks, converting titlist, etc.

How much sac-fresh (tm) is needed to get you to convert another titlist for me?

Thanks

J. <--still the mayor and also the president of iran

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 19, 2009 8:27 pm 
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I only have 3 questions...


1. Who is Wes Hunter?

2. Why does he make your ringwork and points???

3. Does that make you a cuemaker or a cue assembler??


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 20, 2009 12:33 am 
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How much beer does it take to get you to build a cue?
(just curious...know a beer distributor)

Do people under estimate how slow you really are? (wait..I know they do so don't answer that one)

One question I'd like to know is how long until you come through the midwest again, close to indiana, where I can get your butt in a boat and not let you leave until you whittle a cue from a maple branch on the bank?


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 20, 2009 6:18 am 
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one question for eric
when and how in the world will you ever get the time to answer all of the above???? :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 20, 2009 2:57 pm 
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quote]
Hey!! Just because I've set cheese on fire and fkd up instant noodles doesnt mean jack sh1t![/quote]

I will always be willing to cook for Monkey. :mrgreen:


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 20, 2009 4:21 pm 
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Hey Eric, thanks for taking the time to do this as the ATCM is something both unique and informative. Most of the questions I wanted to ask have been posted so I have but two. First I like the scalloped handles you make and as far as I know you are the only cuemaker doing this, could you talk a little about your inspiration or how they came to be? Secondly, I've yet to get my hands on your work but based on online photos your taper appears to be very long rather than the parabolic taper that I associate with stiff cues. I'm curious if your taper was born out of playability, comfort, or just what works for you? Thanks.

Todd

As a sidenote I once asked you about building a cue and you promptly n politely declined. I've emailed other well known cuemakers about a build and they wouldn't even take the time to tell me to piss off, so fwiw thanks for not leaving me hanging. :mrgreen:


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 12:15 pm 
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Thanks for having me. I'll do my best to get through with the answers.

Jimbo: Yes I do believe a cue can make the game easier. I began building cues with that goal in mind & am confident that it has aided my own personal game. By building cues, I can take what I know as a player & experiment with different materials, dimensions & construction techniques to create a cue that feels & responds the way I feel it's supposed to do.

My seemingly abrasive personality online is sharply contrasted to my personality in person. I am the same but without facial expression & voice tone, I am often mistaken or misunderstood online. That said, I am not one to hide my feelings or leave anything to question. You'll know if I like you or not, online or in person. I love people, genuinely. I see the best in humanity & try to be optimistic without losing touch with reality. There are, however, a very few along the way that just should never have been born & I don't hesitate to let them know it.

Shaft wood is what I built my reputation on. I have never really subscribed to the commonly accepted beliefs & stereotypes about maple that dictate how cuemakers use it. Instead I started at square one & explored every angle, so my perception of good shaft wood isn't the same as most. Color is nonsense. I don't care about color so long as it's uniform. In fact, I prefer yellow & brown shaft wood, though I have had incredible white. I have learned that grain line count is only partially important. I cut many trees & every tree I cut I can see the northeastern edge of the tree having very tight grain lines while the SW side always has much wider grain lines. This is due to the travel of the earth around the sun, with it setting in the west & rising in the east, taking the southern route as it goes. The NE side of the tree gets littlke to no sun while the SW gets sun all day. So you can quite literally have 6gpi shafts & 26gpi shafts from the same tree, exact same wood. Growing conditions such as climate, rainfall, terrain, soil, etc. also affect the grain count, which is the indicator of growth rate. In many instances, tight grain lines means an unhealthy tree. So beware.

I learned on my own & became an accomplished builder before I was ever really accepted by other builders. Before that, most were arrogant assholes. A few were polite but wouldn't share anything. So I learned alone. When I came to NM I met Wes Hunter. He & I became good friends & now openly share knowledge, materials, experience, etc. He's been building twice as long as me so it was neat to see how he performs daily tasks. After 20yrs, you become pretty efficient. But that all came too late for apprenticeship. I was already doing well by then. That said, the things I have learned from his experience & knowledge are irreplaceable.

As for cues that play great, I break them down into 2 categories. First is the guys who genuinely strive to enhance playability. The second are the guys who build pretty cues using commonly shared knowledge & their cues as a result play well. I won't go into the second category. But the first is Searing, Harris, & Bender. Harris found a formula early on & has stuck with it. Searing & Bender both continue to advance. I always loved Harris' cues & looked up to him a lot. He inspired the natural color themes in my cues. Bender is also Alaskan & he was somebody local I could look up to, though his words of wisdom came few & far between. But he showed me that a small shop with simple machines can do world class work. It's not the machine, but the guy using it. Searing is a nutcase. He's like the Frankenstein of cuemakers, always creating things & experimenting with one goal in mind, to put a heartbeat in cues.

Inlays don't attract me much. I love BB & Manzino stuff, but at this point have no solid plans of inlaying. I want to master every aspect of playability & construction before I begin putting jewelry on. That's like dressing up a fat lady that refuses to exercise or wash her hair. Once I get comfortable with my cues, i'll then begin inlaying.

Importance of components is a touchy subject for me as I disagree with 99% of other builders. I relate cues to music & as such every aspect has to be equally good or it can be easily noticed & will ruin the performance. Nothing is worth a crap without first having a good base. That tip won't do anything with a crappy ferrule. The ferrule can't support the tip if it's weak or installed wrong. Nothing up there matters if the shaft is junk. The shaft is nmo good if not locked solidly to the butt. It's still no good if the butt is junk. I can go on & on. Basically, I look at a cue from the bumper forward, not the tip back. Everything is equally important.

Coring is great if done correctly. Adhesive choice is paramount, but an almost equal second is glue tollerance. The core wood must be strong & fitting weight & tone for the rest of the cue. I don't believe in drilling everything out & filling with cheap ass maple. Face it, certain woods hit different. Why would I want to order a cocobolo cue that hits & feels just like a maple cue? Sure it's pretty but it's not going to have the crisp snappy feel & sound of the solid cocobolo. When I do core with maple, it's old growth maple from trees I personally cut & milled, no crap. Otherwise I core with rosewoods, purpleheart, koa & jatoba. It all depends on weight, strength, & tone. Sometimes I core, sometimes not. It's all dependent on the situation.

I have built a few hundred cues. Every year I build fewer & fewer. Last year I built maybe 15-20. In the beginning I built a cue every day as I was learning. None ever got sold. They usually got cut up & parts salvaged for more learning & experimentation. When it came to building a cue to sell, I slowed down tremendously & was finally able to begin applying what I had learned over the years prior. Cuemaking is fun for me.

I'll try to get a pic or 2 of my shop, but it's tough. My shop is 8'x18' with one door & one small window that is stuffed with an AC unit. I'll see what I can do.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 12:42 pm 
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Scottr:

I learned wood from the time I was a young boy. I grew up in appalachia & my family home was heated with wood. So I spent my late summers & falls with my dad & brothers, cutting firewood. I learned all of the local trees. I also learned a lot from hunting, which trees squirrels liked to be around, which trees deer would stay close to due to eating the bark, etc. My family has a sawmill, too. So I learned to mill lumber & got an idea of which woods were hard, soft, strong, etc. When I got into cuemaking, I basically became obsessed. I wanted to learn everything about everything. Naturally I started with the wood. It's a continuing education. There's thousands of trees suitable for cuemaking. Knowing everything about them allows me to choose combinations that work well with one another. But I still have lots to learn.

The most satisfying part of cuemaking is the "magic cues". Some cues just seem like they can play by themselves. They bring my game up a ball or two just by using them, seriously. That feels great, a huge sense of accomplishment. Not all are like that, in fact most are not. But a few really make me feel good & inspire me to keep trying. The worst part of cuemaking is the nits. Pool is unfortunately full of scum.

My machines consist of 3 bandsaws, a drill press, belt sander, planer, jointer, etc. My lathes are a heavily modded model-B porper, a heavily modded cuesmith deluxe, & am old jet that I use for threading & making joint pins. I have a taper machine in the works & when complete will be a huge asset.

If I weren't a cuemaker I don't know what i'd buy. The lack of suitable cues is why I began building in the first place. I knew what I wanted but couldn't get it from any cue I tried, so I said to hell with it & began doing it myself. That said, one builder that really impressed me is Dickie Neighbors. He built a shaft for me once & it was EXACTLY as I ordered it & it played awesome.

When I first began, I had an open mind to explore & experiment infinitely until I found the magic formula. I'm still searching.

Aside from cuemaking, my time is spent with my family. I love spending time with the kids. I also fish & hunt, though nowadays I don't like killing anything. But I still love being in the woods. I also travel a lot, roughly 4-5 times per year i'm far away from home for one thing or another. As a family we take a couple vacations per year. For wood hunting, I go almost anywhere.

I decided to build cues when I was in Korea & my ferrule broke. I fixed it myself & that was it, I was hooked. I was also playing a lot back then but never found what I liked in a cue so it all fell into place.

I don't use the flat face joint exclusively, but mostly. The joint doesn't matter so much as long as it's strong & high quality. I use my joint type for practical purposes. It's easy for anybody to get their cue repaired or buy aftermarket gadgets like laminated shafts & such.

Worminator could be maffia, maybe, perhaps. As long as i'm on his good side I don't care to know.

Dave B exists. I met him. He's almost Kiser Sose, seriously. Nice guy. But his shop was entirely too clean, he was hiding something. His dogs were naked when I was there, but it was in late May so it was very hot. Next time I visit i'll go Columbo style & get the scoop for you.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 12:44 pm 
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Icon of Sin:

My cues are a sum of all components. If I had to choose anything as paramount, it would be choice of wood.

I'm no top builder of all time, but i'm gonna be....or at least it's a personal goal. The top three in my opinion are Harvey Martin, Gus Szamboti & David Kersenbrock.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 12:58 pm 
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Pharaoh68:

DPK, advancing cuemaking in structural & playability terms. Black Boar, advancing the artistic limits of cuemaking plus strives to advance construction techniques. Dennis Searing, taking common tasks to a new level & pushing the limits higher for everybody to meet, insane attention to detail.

I don't care for artificial colors. Veneers just don't get me excited. I use veneers sometimes but it's usually black or natural, nothing colorful. That said, I have 2 cues going with vibrant veneer work. But it's not my style of choice.

Based on beauty alone, it's tough to beat top grade quilted sapele. It's beauty is unmatched. A close second would be top grade quilted bubinga.

My favorite woods for playability are middleweight & heavy rosewoods, koa, purpleheart, & high tone heavy maple.

There are several cuemakers not doing such a great job. That's ok because each person has a different code of standards they live by. But the ones who really bother me are the few who hype themselves up when they obviously have limited skills. They also seem to all hang out in the dark side. Copycats also bother me, whether copying mine or somebody else. It's unoriginal, foul, & blatant theft. Take that "highest form of flattery" & shove it up their ass. That's just something copiers say like fat chics say beauty is on the inside. Bullshit.

Cuegars are cool. Scary at times but a fresh change of pace from the typical nut huggers.

My kids will be whatever they want & i'll support them. But cuemaking is not gonna happen unless they are already financially established in life & is something they'll do for fun only. Kinda like the way I went about it.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 1:03 pm 
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Pavlos:

I have several favorite wood combinations. I think texas ebony with curly maple is tough to beat. Palisander & curly maple is also very tough to beat. Kam-phi rosewood with koa is another good one.

I'll use any wood so long as it's suitable for the application. I'd use pine if it were figured & different.

I am working on some really cool stuff right now. I decided to slow down & only build the challenging stuff for a year or two. There'll be a new twist on my scallops, as well as a very cool point design i'm going to use. No pics yet.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 1:05 pm 
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Tommy Stanfill:

1/2" ivory ferrules are fine. I'd say use a 5/16" threaded tenon with no cap. Use a good fiber or phenolic pad to protect the ferrule's edges from cracking & don't let your tip get too thin. It'll be fine.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 1:15 pm 
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MONKEY :P :

Your list was already in order.

11 on scared of small Asian girls. They are beautiful but their instantaneous personality changes freak me out.

I'm batting 5 on cuegars. Some are hot, some are not. Some are fun, some are scary as hell.

Aside from TAR, there is one promising female player I made a deal with. If she gets a tour ticket, she gets a badass cue. I trust her & have 100% faith in her so she'll get the cue, anyway. I know she'll get there. But TAR is number one. They are doing pool a HUGE favor & somebody needs to back them. We all gotta work together & do our part if we want to continue enjoying this game.

I was introduced to sacfresh, yes. It was a tramatic phase of my life & my shrink doesn't feel i'm ready to openly talk about it yet.

Crispy doesn't bother me. I have been called much, much worse. In fact, i'm so numb to names that I answer to almost anything. OH GOD!!!, HOLY SHIT!!!!, RIGHT THERE!!!! are names I enjoy.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 1:23 pm 
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cuecaps:

Hi Alton. I don't do anything to draw oil from woods. Rght before the first coat of finish, I wipe down with denatured alcohol to clear the dust & surface oils, but I never try to pull oils out from beneath the surface.

I use an acrylic based finish that levels out as the lathe spins slow. I apply it by pouring it on while spreading it with a playing card. I quit spraying finish a long time ago. I thin the frst coat so that it penetrates the wood surface & gives a solid base to layer on the coats.

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