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PostPosted: Tue May 31, 2011 4:02 pm 
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Oooooh! I just thought of one last one! I swear, I won't ask anymore AND... if I'm too late, I'll understand.

Design theft is a big issue here (given our namesake, lol). But that being said, there was a discussion recently on another forum in which a very well-known cuemaker seemed to imply that cuemakers as a whole should STRIVE to create new and original designs that blend art with cues. And while this is something that you and a number of others are known for doing (extremely well I might add), a LOT of people thought "Well, I like traditional, 4 pointers" or "I like simple box cues".

That being said... do you feel that there is a NEED for all cuemakers to strive to blend cue design with art in an effort to create something new and unique OR is there a place for guys who build 4 points with veneers and some diamond inlays (for example)?

Thanks again for your time! Much obliged!

-B

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PostPosted: Tue May 31, 2011 4:42 pm 
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cyrex wrote:
Richard,
Do you still do other types of art work to keep yourself creatively inspired? Can you name some artists that personally inspire you? And lastly, what's your favorite pool game to play?

Thanks for taking the time to answer our questions.

~Rex
P.S. LOVE the cue you're currently shooting with. Appears to be ebony with a brown wrap. Very clean design! Have any pics or specs on it handy?


Rex,
No, not really. Keeping up with cues is plenty busy enough. That and keeping the machines running smoothly in as short a period of time as possible is the challenge. Seriously though looking for new ideas that translate to cues takes up some time and being aware enough to recognize new things keeps the juices flowing.

As far as inspirational artists go Andy Warhol made a pretty good living calling attention to the mundane and obvious, repetitively.

Since I play it the most probably Eight Ball.

Thanks, It's a five point bridged design U/D, amboynia on ebony with malachite inlays and a cool matching elephant wrap. You can hit some with it next time we cross.


rc3


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PostPosted: Tue May 31, 2011 4:57 pm 
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RogerO wrote:
Richard:
Are there elements of construction that you won't "mess" with because you feel that they affect the structural integrity or "hit" of the cue? Do you think there are any elements that others might use that for this reason you wouldn't?

thanks,
Roger



Roger,

While I am always looking for better ways to do things right now I am very satisfied with my basic platform and I don't see any big changes in the future but you never know.

As far as elements that other makers might use, well isn't that why there are so many of us? While we all make cues I'd guess that we all do it differently for as many reasons as there are cue makers. As long as the basics are clean and close most any design will work. But, I hope you are all learning here that my way is...the best!!


rc3


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PostPosted: Tue May 31, 2011 5:49 pm 
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Hidy Ho wrote:
Mr. Chudy,

What the hell is 3 behind RC3? Is this a cuemaker thing? Is it similar to Murray Tucker III?

Any comment about current cue market and how it impacts you and/or other cue makers? It seems like "wrapless" cues are more popular, traditional designs are en vogue and "artistic" cues are not in demand or hold values, IMHO. Also, what is the impact of Japan/Asian market which appears to be down? It seems like some cue makers who sold prodominantly in J market are now vying for US market?


Hidy Ho III 3



That's Mr. 3 to you sir!!

What's to say about the current market except what a downer. It's been like a perfect storm. But things seem to be picking up. It would be nice if things were like say 10 years ago but nooooo! We are just going to have to recognize what it is and move on.

The Japanese market has been shrinking for a while now but I hear more and more about China wanting the genuine article. Seems a bit weird and scary to me. It certainly couldn't hurt if the Asian markets start to get competitive with each other. Maybe a third cycle is just around the corner.

I know I've been doing more domestic busyness lately. I'm thinkin' that maybe I'm finally gettin' discovered.


rccc


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PostPosted: Tue May 31, 2011 5:56 pm 
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ELBeau wrote:
1- What are your favorite woods/materials to work with and why?
2- What are your least favorite woods/materials to work with and why?
3- What were some of your biggest "lightbulb moments" in cuebuilding when things just clicked and made sense?
4- I LOVE shop pics, too. If you could post some, or discuss some of your machinery- inquiring minds want to know.

PS- Great meeting you twice this past 12 months at both SBE and ICCS. You and yours were very gracious to an inquisitive fella!

~Beau



Hey Beau,

Ivory is a pure joy to work with while steel and stone are the pits but I think maybe I've answered this earlier.

The biggest light bulb moment equals CNC. What a tool.

Shop pics are pending.

Thanks,

rc3


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PostPosted: Tue May 31, 2011 6:06 pm 
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chris byrne wrote:
What was the one part of cue construction/finishing/playability that took you the longest to perfect?


Hey Chris,
Actually all of the above and the process goes on and nothing is perfect. Making cues is one long learning process and it shouldn't stop. The longer you do it the more knowledge you acquire to apply to the craft/art. There is always a weak link that needs attention.


rc3


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PostPosted: Tue May 31, 2011 6:26 pm 
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gadroon wrote:
Thank you for taking the time to answer questions for us.
How do you create your designs, use a computer program and which one, or do you work old school with paper and colored pencils?
Also, though I've admired your designs, I have never played with one of your cues so how would you describe the hit, or can it be modified by wood choices, joint and ferrule type, etc?
Thanks again, Patrick



Designs are worked up several ways. I use Mastercam as my CAD/CAM software so sometimes I just use it to draw or layout designs. Pencil and paper also serve a purpose. Sometimes both with scanned drawn images. It also depends on how much massaging a design needs.

I'd describe the hit as soft and stiff. Maybe some people that use my cues could help me out here. Of course I say they hit a ton but what does that really mean??

And yes the characteristics of any cue can be influenced by tip/ferrule choices and materials. While I strive for consistency each cue should be individually accessed but mine are all fairly close.


rc3


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PostPosted: Tue May 31, 2011 6:38 pm 
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Jake wrote:
Richard,

You make a great looking cue and your desings are very inspirational, can't comment on the hit as i have never handled one.

One question. What is the little knob/button you have your right hand on at the base of the cnc, on your website?

Also, the rotary and collet chuck, custom? thats pretty cool

I'm sure the requests for shop pics will be a long shot, but i'm hopin theres a chance you will. especially the cnc




Sorry Jake, but that's top secret stuff, can't tell ya. And yes it is custom indexer. Very cool, very adjustable with very big collets. If you want one let me know and I'll turn you on to Ron Weber in Laurel, Montana.


rc3

P.S.
It just looks like I'm turning a knob, funky angle.


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PostPosted: Tue May 31, 2011 6:48 pm 
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CKurzweil wrote:
Hi Mr. Chudy. Your cues are awesome. It seems all the good questions have been asked. Are you a pool player yourself and if so what is your favorite discipline. And most importantly what is your favorite kind of steak :mrgreen: .



Hey Chris,
Would you please call me Mr.3 like the other guy?? Rick will do too. What's my favorite discipline?? Do I have to wear a mask or anything leather?? Hey, I'll play ya some Eight Ball if you stop by. And my favorite steak is anything that shows up on my front porch from Kurzweils' Country Meats. Toss in some sausages, your choice, and just send me the bill!!


rc3


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PostPosted: Tue May 31, 2011 7:27 pm 
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ScottR wrote:
Richard,

Like others, I want to thank you for your time and contribution to the forum.

1. What do you consider to be the major milestones in "modern" cuemaking; say over the past 30 years or so?

2. Are there aspects of cuemaking that you want to improve upon?

3. Who are your top 5 currently active cue makers?

Scott



Well Scott, it would be hard to overlook CNC as the tool for modern cue making. The Showcase of American Cue Art helped set a new standard for cues at all levels. Thomas Wayne's $100,000.00 Celtic Prince certainly was a milestone. The formation of the ACA and the ICCS helped organize a couple of disparaging groups. And of course the day my rc3 logo was trademarked!! Just kidding, a millstone maybe but not a milestone.

I'd like to improve all aspects of my cue making. Everything just seems to be getting better and better so why not me?

Top 5 active cue makers? In no particular order Jerry, Jim an Dave, Bill, Richard, Ron, Bob, Tony, Bill, Mike, Thomas, Mickey, Ernie, Ed. Ariel, Dennis, John, Barry, Joel, and I can't quite remember the last one. Oh, yeah...me. And if I forgot any one I apologize. I don't think I or anyone else can come up with just 5. There are just too many good ones. Sorry.


rc3

P.S.
I was thinking last night and forgot to mention Bob Meucci. He certainly is a milestone, The Taj Mahal, landscapes on cues, exotic ring work. Back in the eighties he made a pretty big splash.

And I don't know if it was a milestone but the Palmer cue, I can't think of the name or model, the cue with the curvy veneers, certainly was a departure from the norm at the time.


Last edited by rc3 on Wed Jun 01, 2011 3:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue May 31, 2011 8:31 pm 
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Location: !! fvckin NIT !!
MR. RCCC,

Since there are no photos of your shop, do you mind sharing some major equipments that you have in your shop? Lathe, CNC and all other secret stuff?

Also, you planning to keep making cues for awhile longer?

What do you think about others doing "tributes" of your design now or in next generation while you and I are sharing popcorns from heaven? Is that OK with you or not?


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PostPosted: Tue May 31, 2011 10:50 pm 
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rc3 wrote:
chris byrne wrote:
What was the one part of cue construction/finishing/playability that took you the longest to perfect?


Hey Chris,
Actually all of the above and the process goes on and nothing is perfect. Making cues is one long learning process and it shouldn't stop. The longer you do it the more knowledge you acquire to apply to the craft/art. There is always a weak link that needs attention.


rc3

I should have phrased it which process for a specific part or method of building did you fight with the longest untill you found a method or process to overcome the problem and get results you could live with. I agree nothing is ever perfect and there is always improvements to be made.

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 01, 2011 4:33 pm 
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pharaoh68 wrote:
Oooooh! I just thought of one last one! I swear, I won't ask anymore AND... if I'm too late, I'll understand.

Design theft is a big issue here (given our namesake, lol). But that being said, there was a discussion recently on another forum in which a very well-known cuemaker seemed to imply that cuemakers as a whole should STRIVE to create new and original designs that blend art with cues. And while this is something that you and a number of others are known for doing (extremely well I might add), a LOT of people thought "Well, I like traditional, 4 pointers" or "I like simple box cues".

That being said... do you feel that there is a NEED for all cuemakers to strive to blend cue design with art in an effort to create something new and unique OR is there a place for guys who build 4 points with veneers and some diamond inlays (for example)?

Thanks again for your time! Much obliged!

-B




Design theft eh? I was really disappointed to see the results of a poll over at AZ where almost half of the responders thought it was fair game for any design. I think 62 to 69 or something close to that. What a bunch of crooks! These guys are the cover bands of cue making destined to perform Satisfaction till the death.

There isn't anything wrong with traditional cues and as long as there are customers that want four point cues there will be cue makers that will oblige, myself included. The problem I see is that some people in this school think it's the only way and act accordingly. It's like the digital vs analog argument. Just cuz you do it one way don't disparage the other. If you stick with it long enough you'll get there too.

IMO there is no need for cue makers to blend there craft with art. Some just can't. Not everyone can be Chip Foose or TW. If you want to build '32 fords all day long go ahead but don't tell the world it's the only true hot rod. If you do this you are totally missing the point. There is a place for both schools with mutual respect.


rc3


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 01, 2011 5:22 pm 
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Hidy Ho wrote:
MR. RCCC,

Since there are no photos of your shop, do you mind sharing some major equipments that you have in your shop? Lathe, CNC and all other secret stuff?

Also, you planning to keep making cues for awhile longer?

What do you think about others doing "tributes" of your design now or in next generation while you and I are sharing popcorns from heaven? Is that OK with you or not?



The shop consists of 3 36 inch machine lathes, a manual milling machine, a sanding, finishing, polishing station, a table saw shaft machine, a custom built CNC controlled tapering machine and 2 CNC controlled custom built over arm milling machines, drill press, drum sander and two band saws.

One lathe is a tracer (from the very beginning) but it's mostly used now to turn straight dowels. The other two lathes are used for all my straight work like threading, tenons and stuff. One of these machines is equipped with a frequency drive motor (variable speed) and is pretty cool. The manual milling machine is used for making things. The station is equipped with an exhaust fan for painting and a pretty good dust collector for sanding (3 hp Oneida system). The dust collector is hooked up to the rest of the machines and is very efficient. The CNC tapering machine is used for some rough work and all finish tapers, butts and shafts. It turns a 10 inch saw blade with a frequency drive spindle and is pretty cool. The two CNC mills are identical, one for parts and one for pockets.

I've always joked with Cindy that when I retire I'm going to start making cues. But I think I have a few more years in me before that happens.

OK, I have a thing about 'tributes'. The way I look at it it sounds like 'hey, I just ripped you off but I am also giving you credit so it's OK'. Especially if the vic is still alive. If someone is going to make a knock off for someone keep it to yourself. Don't post it up a brag about it. You have no idea what that does to your rep unless you want to be known for that kind of thing. Just because you can doesn't mean you should. A little sensitivity should be observed. As far as a dead vic goes I'd prefer to hear 'in the style of' rather than 'tribute'. And after we're both gone...what flavor popcorn you got?


rc3


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 02, 2011 2:39 am 
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chris byrne wrote:
rc3 wrote:
chris byrne wrote:
What was the one part of cue construction/finishing/playability that took you the longest to perfect?


Hey Chris,
Actually all of the above and the process goes on and nothing is perfect. Making cues is one long learning process and it shouldn't stop. The longer you do it the more knowledge you acquire to apply to the craft/art. There is always a weak link that needs attention.


rc3

I should have phrased it which process for a specific part or method of building did you fight with the longest untill you found a method or process to overcome the problem and get results you could live with. I agree nothing is ever perfect and there is always improvements to be made.



You know I think the answer is the same. Over the years the whole cue evolves as you learn new techniques or ways of doing things until one day the cue really your cue. I never really had a problem with any one aspect. Maybe because it evolved over a pretty long time. Once the cue really becomes yours' the search goes on for simpler, quicker ways to get things done. This is the beginning of a very important decision, the line that few dare to cross. Once you figure out how to do it quicker, cheaper, faster do you really want to cross the line. It's a funky trade off, exclusivity vs production...and you get to choose.


rc3


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