RIP Dennis Dieckman
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ATCM # 2 Mike Webb
http://www.jimboarmy.com/phpbb_6/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=900
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Author:  JimBo [ Mon Oct 27, 2008 12:48 am ]
Post subject:  ATCM # 2 Mike Webb

In 1991 Mike Webb fell in love with cues and started to do small repairs in local pool rooms in RI. Mike's love of cues drove him to start to examine how cues were built, Mike already had a background with machines so doing small repairs seemed like a natural. With his new thirst for knowledge about cues he started to seek out people who could teach him the ins and outs this lead him to CT where Paul Drexler of PFD cues Paul helped feed that thirst. Another person who helped teach Mike the ropes was Dave Doucette from Samsara cues.

Mike went on to do repair work at many local events including tour stops for the Zugland Joss tour working on some of the greatest player's cues. Mike took all this knowledge and decided to make his first cue in 1994 and he hasn't looked back.

Being from the area I have followed Mike's work from his early days to his recuts and present day where he is now making some great short splice blanks, if you haven't scene Mike's points you are in for a treat. I know here we have many fans of Mike's work so this thread should be pretty good and I hope we get a few people to add their Webb cues in this thread.
For the new members who don't know these threads are our chance to ask these makers some questions, this thread will be open for a few days and then Mike will answer them. The thread then gets closed, so you have only 3-4 days to ask your questions, it's a great chance to get to pick a cue makers brain and it's also a great chance to get to know a great guy.

As always I get to ask the first question so here goes.

Mike first I want to thank you (in advance) for taking time out to answer these questions.

1) I feel like paying your dues doing lots of repair work is the best way to *understand* cues and to turn you into a true cuemaker, can you give some examples of what things you've learned by paying your dues as a repairman??

2) In your opinion what is the most important part of the cue when we are talking about the *HIT*?

Jim <----Thanks Mike

Author:  buddha162 [ Mon Oct 27, 2008 2:20 am ]
Post subject:  Re: ATCM # 2 Mike Webb

First!

Mike, I've always considered points and veneers to be the foundational element of traditional cues. I strongly prefer to see fat, deep points with little gapage between them (I also like to see veneers that line up to its corresponding veneer in adjacent points, or come close to it, but that's another thread!) My question is, how hard is it to achieve this when building traditional 4-point cues?

I've also seen two ways this is generally accomplished: deep points and wide points. Can you elaborate on the differences in these two techniques?

Thanks,
roger

Author:  johnbo [ Mon Oct 27, 2008 9:19 am ]
Post subject:  Re: ATCM # 2 Mike Webb

yakem to da flakem booty yakum....... do you speak jive?


now for the important question is my cue done yet?

take care.

Author:  Michael Webb [ Mon Oct 27, 2008 9:23 am ]
Post subject:  Re: ATCM # 2 Mike Webb

Mike first I want to thank you (in advance) for taking time out to answer these questions.

1) I feel like paying your dues doing lots of repair work is the best way to *understand* cues and to turn you into a true cuemaker, can you give some examples of what things you've learned by paying your dues as a repairman??

2) In your opinion what is the most important part of the cue when we are talking about the *HIT*?

Jim <----Thanks Mike[/color][/b][/quote]


Hi Jim
Thank you for inviting me, I'm honored.
One of the most important things I have ever learned about different cues is simple but not easy for a lot of people, Accept why and how something was done instead of condeming why it was done.
My opinion on hit is to use good seasoned wood. Don't assume just because you paid -X- amount of dollars for the wood that it's good because it may not be. Time will be the judge.

Author:  Michael Webb [ Mon Oct 27, 2008 9:34 am ]
Post subject:  Re: ATCM # 2 Mike Webb

buddha162 wrote:
First!

Mike, I've always considered points and veneers to be the foundational element of traditional cues. I strongly prefer to see fat, deep points with little gapage between them (I also like to see veneers that line up to its corresponding veneer in adjacent points, or come close to it, but that's another thread!) My question is, how hard is it to achieve this when building traditional 4-point cues?

I've also seen two ways this is generally accomplished: deep points and wide points. Can you elaborate on the differences in these two techniques?

Thanks,
roger


Hi Roger
I to like the traditional cues, Set up is the key, I know of 4 ways to accomplish them, Table saw, Lathe, milling machine and CNC. I still use a lathe with an index head along with a 1/2" router, 1" Vee cutting bit. I use to use a 1/4" router but found I couldn't do the wider points I wanted to have because of vibration. The two most important style machines I have are table saws and an accurate lathe. Important for repeatability. Quality veneer stock plays a very important role in consistancy along with proper gluing techniques.

Author:  Michael Webb [ Mon Oct 27, 2008 9:36 am ]
Post subject:  Re: ATCM # 2 Mike Webb

johnbo wrote:
yakem to da flakem booty yakum....... do you speak jive?


now for the important question is my cue done yet?

take care.


Regretfully, no to all the above. :oops:

Author:  Koop [ Mon Oct 27, 2008 9:54 am ]
Post subject:  Re: ATCM # 2 Mike Webb

Hey buddy,

My question also deals with hit. I have hit with many of your cues, different joints, woods, etc... and they all play relatively similar. Can you share a little of how this accomplished?

Also, your points/veneers are now some of the best in cuemaking. What are you doing now to consistently get them so even and sharp?

Thanks,
Koop

Author:  brooklynjay [ Mon Oct 27, 2008 10:16 am ]
Post subject:  Re: ATCM # 2 Mike Webb

hi mike!

there seems to be a lot of people who are interested in becoming a cue maker. what would be your advice to them?

thanks!

Jay

Author:  ScottR [ Mon Oct 27, 2008 10:29 am ]
Post subject:  Re: ATCM # 2 Mike Webb

Since I pick your brain all of the time, I'll try to stick to general questions.

1. Do you have a favorite wood to work with? Least favorite?
2. Finishing or shafts, which is harder?
3. About how many cues do you make in a year?
4. Do you have any plans for changes to your cues, construction or looks-wise?
5. How much coffee do you drink in a 24 hour period? :mrgreen:

Scott <<== will get a peek at the Webb shop some day....oh yes I will

Author:  Michael Webb [ Mon Oct 27, 2008 11:06 am ]
Post subject:  Re: ATCM # 2 Mike Webb

Koop wrote:
Hey buddy,

My question also deals with hit. I have hit with many of your cues, different joints, woods, etc... and they all play relatively similar. Can you share a little of how this accomplished?

Also, your points/veneers are now some of the best in cuemaking. What are you doing now to consistently get them so even and sharp?

Thanks,
Koop


Hi Dave, Table saw, jointer and sander.

Author:  Michael Webb [ Mon Oct 27, 2008 11:14 am ]
Post subject:  Re: ATCM # 2 Mike Webb

brooklynjay wrote:
hi mike!

there seems to be a lot of people who are interested in becoming a cue maker. what would be your advice to them?

thanks!

Jay


Unfortunately bad subject with me in today's society of Internet, Not many understand the learning curve, everyone wants it now. I will probably take the most heat for saying to Cue makers, if you can't sell a cue, might as well, sell a video. Instead of answering questions with logical questions to make serious people think, they try to provide quick and easy answers. BAD TEACHING.

Author:  Michael Webb [ Mon Oct 27, 2008 11:22 am ]
Post subject:  Re: ATCM # 2 Mike Webb

ScottR wrote:
Since I pick your brain all of the time, I'll try to stick to general questions.

1. Do you have a favorite wood to work with? Least favorite?
I don't like the palm woods.
2. Finishing or shafts, which is harder?
Both have there own discipline
3. About how many cues do you make in a year?
Depends on repairs, 50 max.
4. Do you have any plans for changes to your cues, construction or looks-wise?
I like the classic look
5. How much coffee do you drink in a 24 hour period? :mrgreen:
5 doubles.
Scott <<== will get a peek at the Webb shop some day....oh yes I will

I like friends but I don't like company.

Author:  thepavlos [ Mon Oct 27, 2008 1:17 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: ATCM # 2 Mike Webb

Hi Mike
Do you ever have annoying "customers" who talk too much and come over at odd times? How do you handle such people? :mrgreen:
Paul

Author:  The Woim [ Mon Oct 27, 2008 2:09 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: ATCM # 2 Mike Webb

Mr. Webb,

Do you place much stock in the different grades of maple wood?

Which grade do you use for your shafts?

The Woim

Author:  Hidy Ho [ Mon Oct 27, 2008 2:35 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: ATCM # 2 Mike Webb

Mr. Webb,

Recut vs. veneers ... any preference and pros and cons of each (if any)? I personally like recut points .. they are way more purdy than veneers. I've heard that reason veneers were used was to create a stiffer forearm????

Also, will you ever divulge your low deflection shaft ideal? Failing that, will you just send me one? :D

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